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  • in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #30955

    illini012
    Participant

    Hello, do most top 20 MBA programs check with the National Student Clearinghouse for all previous enrollment in other colleges and Universities?

    I was academically disqualified while getting my 2nd Bachelor’s degree 13 years ago because of lack of motivation. Since then I have successfully completed a MS in IT with a high GPA and I recently scored a 770 in my GMAT.

    Thanks

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #34791

    illini012
    Participant

    Hello, this is a GREAT forum.

    I took my GMAT for 2nd time last week and was able to raise my score from 720 (3 years ago) to 770. I am very happy. =)

    Here is my profile:

    GMAT: 770 (49Q, 47V)
    UGPA: 2.6 from Big 10 school in History
    Graduate GPA: 3.5 from Boston University for MS in Information Systems
    Age: 37 (already!)

    I failed both calculus AND economics as undergrad. But that was so long ago, people who were born back then are now failing calculus and economics in undergrad. But I have since received an A (not just A-) on Stats and Calculus course from Boston Univrsity.

    I have been in the IT industry (I am Asian) for 12 years and have good career progression. I have, however, no formal management experience.

    Do I have a legitimate shot at the following programs? (in order of preference)

    1)Cornell Accelerated 1 year MBA.
    2)UCLA FEMBA
    3)Berkeley Part Time MBA.

    Thanks

    in reply to: advice #34715

    illini012
    Participant

    As my GMAT instructor once told me, even an idiot can get a 650 if they try hard enough. It seems like you are a smart enough fellow to score 700+ if you study hard enough. A 700+ score usually requires 200+ hours of studying.

    in reply to: am i waisting my time? #34580

    illini012
    Participant

    One thing I would like to mention is that you have really pathetic grammar for an Ivy League Grad.

    quote:


    Originally posted by cholula23

    hi, i graduated in 2005 from an ivy league university with a gpa of a 3.8…have had three years of work experience at a respectable strategy consulting firm. i have solid extracurricular activities, leadership experience, and recommenders. however, i cant get my gmat score above a 640 (after three tries!). everyone says i shouldnt bother applying to harvard, stanford, mit, or kellogg…should i really be setting my goals lower? as i start applications, im troubled what I should do. with a 680 i wouldnt have any doubts but to apply to stanford and wharton…but now im just not sure!


    in reply to: am i waisting my time? #34579

    illini012
    Participant

    Success in GMAT seems to be depend on 3 things.

    1)Intelligence. Your intelligence (speed in processing information, ability to reason quickly and precisely, spatial reasoning, short term memory etc) puts a ceiling on how well you can score on GMAT. Statistically, it appears most people have the capacity to score at least 680. An ivy leaguer such as yourself probably has 760+ potential.

    2)Proper Methodology. This seems obvious, but GMAT tests PRIMARILY your ability to solve a predefined set of GMAT questions (not real world problems). This has several implications, the main one being is the ability to use proper methodology quickly and accurately is crucial. In fact, it is the name of the GMAT game. I would get a private GMAT tutor (Manhattan GMAT) who had scored at least 780 to GMAT to show you the best metholodgy to solve each type of GMAT problem. Planning on spending $2000-$3000 on such tutors.

    3)Practice. GMAC’s own statistics reveal that people who scored 700+ had studied at least 114 hours whereas people who scored 680- had studied less than 100 hours. There appears to be a strong correlation betwen hours of studied and the GMAT score. Because of law of diminishing returns also applies to GMAT, you probably need to study around 200+ hours to get a 750+ score you would need to get into a top 5 MBA program.

    quote:


    Originally posted by cholula23

    hi, i graduated in 2005 from an ivy league university with a gpa of a 3.8…have had three years of work experience at a respectable strategy consulting firm. i have solid extracurricular activities, leadership experience, and recommenders. however, i cant get my gmat score above a 640 (after three tries!). everyone says i shouldnt bother applying to harvard, stanford, mit, or kellogg…should i really be setting my goals lower? as i start applications, im troubled what I should do. with a 680 i wouldnt have any doubts but to apply to stanford and wharton…but now im just not sure!


    in reply to: retaking gmat #34571

    illini012
    Participant

    I recommend getting a private tutor. Or,if you haven’t already, take a GMAT prep couse from a very good teacher (the ones who scored at least 770 on the GMAT).

    Good luck

    in reply to: Little work experience and advice needed… #34567

    illini012
    Participant

    I think the amount of work required to be a full time mother/housewife with two children is very much underappreciated and undervalued. They do not, however, count as real world work experience. There are things you learn at work (office politics, teamwork, leadership skills, project management etc) which you can’t learn from home.

    I think the best thing to do is change your major to something more useful than Anthropology. You are right it does not hold market value and it isn’t too late to change it. I am sure with your GPA you are eligible for a transfer to a more lucrative major such as Accounting or Finance.

    One thing workplace teaches you is that while learning is good, it takes learning MARKETABLE SKILLS to get ahead. This is something Universities intentionally neglect to tell you (they never told me). I suppose it is the only way to fill up the Antropology major quota.

    Yes, you may need to attend undergrad for extra year or two to change your major, but it will be LOT cheaper getting a BS in Accouting than an MBA, and it will be worth almost as much.

    After couple of years of experience as accy or finance professional, if you still feel you need an MBA, then I would say go for it.

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #32759

    illini012
    Participant

    The recent rise of MBA applications has caused me a lot of angst. It appears the MBA applicants will continue to rise as the echo boomers (1982-1995) are now becoming of age to apply to MBA schools. I plan to apply to MBA programs for the 2008 school year.

    Here are my stats:

    1)Very low undergraduate GPA (2.6) in History from Big-10 school. My GPA in the last 40 hrs was 3.3. I graduated back in 1994.
    2)Just took GMAT last month for 720 (6 months of hard study!).
    3)MS in Information Systems (3.5 GPA) from UCLA received in 2005.
    4)I am 38 and work in IT (database) making $150k/year.
    5)I am starting to take pre-MBA courses (calc, econ, mgmt etc) at UCLA extension and plan to finish 7-10 courses prior to B-School.

    What are my chances for the following programs?

    1)Nortwhestern (1 year program with Business course pre-requisites).
    2)Cornell (12 month option for those with MS).
    3)UCLA (Part-Time)

    Thanks in advance.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)