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  • in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #52524
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hi LaDonna. Thanks for your post. As you must suspect, PhD programs are very competitive. Certainly, they will consider your MBA GPA ā€“ but that will not erase your undergraduate grades Iā€™m afraid. It would be wise to select a wide range of programs as some will not look past the lower GPA and some may not take your online MBA as direct evidence of potential. To help overcome low grades ā€“ you will need exemplary letters of recommendation and a breadth of work that shows your competence and readiness for a PhD program. Good luck.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #52366
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. I think you are asking about how to ask your current UCI advisors to write letters to other programs? First, I think you are smart to look around at other PhD programs and in my experience, most professors/faculty/advisors appreciate a student that is exploring his/her options. I would suggest that you are honest – that UCI is very appealing and you would like to attend but that you are applying to a few programs to make sure you have options. You might also consider adding a letter or two from your undergraduate institution/faculty. Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #51956
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. I’m afraid the 2.5 is going to be a tough barrier. You will need to focus on graduate schools that are a bit more flexible in their admission criteria. You should also be clear and address why your grades are low – take every opportunity you can to “explain” your story of pre-med being a mistake for you (not making excuses though). Highlight your recent grades. Be sure to select Letters of recommendation from professors that will directly address and speak to your academic performance and potential. Your GRE scores will be critical as well.
    Good luck in your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #51885
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hi Joyce. Thanks for your post. It sounds like you’ve done a good job post undergraduate studies to prepare yourself for graduate study. It’s not clear how long you’ve been out of school – but I’m guessing you are applying to programs early in your career. Your grades are ok and I’m guessing your GRE scores are in a percentile that will be ok as well. What I can’t see is how/if you’ve completed courses such as Economics and Statistics – many MPP programs use these as benchmark courses and will want to see good grades in these kinds of courses.
    Given the above – I think you are competitive enough to apply to the schools you have listed but it won’t be easy. You will need to really focus on your essays and communicating your passion and understanding for the field. You will also need to be thoughtful about your letters of recommendation – make sure you are selecting unique references that can shed light on any concern areas.
    You might also consider adding 1 or 2 schools to your list as safety schools – assuming starting graduate school soon is a priority.
    Good luck with your search.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #51605
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Certainly a pattern of withdrawals on your college transcript can have a negative impact on your graduate school chances. However, there is no magic number of how many is too many. No matter the number – you will need to dedicate a portion of time explaining to the admissions committee why you needed to withdraw and how this does not adequately reflect your academic performance or potential. If you have a few Ws on your transcripts upon graduate – although not ideal – they can be mitigated with excellent Letters of recommendation, a great essay and good test scores.

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #51343
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. You are correct, most of your efforts and time should go towards preparing for the Quantitative Section of the test and towards your research outline/essays, contact with professors etc. That said – I think the verbal is worth a review – you do want to show your verbal ability to some degree.
    Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #51131
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. If your econ related grades are strong and you can get strong academic econ letters of reference to account for your aptitude, you should be fine with well-prepared applications.

    If the GRE comes in lower, you might need to use additional application space such as the addendum.

    Good luck with your studies.

    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50935
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. I think if you’re main objective is a PhD – work experience is not as critical. However, it never hurts to get a better understanding of the kinds of jobs/careers you could do if you ended with your Masters in Literature. I don’t think it’s worth delaying graduate school to get work experience – but volunteer/shadow opportunities are always good to have in your application.
    Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50883
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Not a silly question at all. I think any time a school is getting positive publicity – it is reasonable to expect a bump in applications – and yes, a bit more competitive for applicants.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50825
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. A W on your transcript can have a negative impact if your grades are below average overall or below what the program considers competitive. If you have more than 1 W or incomplete – that can also reflect poorly on you in the admissions process. In a competitive, well put together application – 1 W is not the end of the world.
    Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50791
    hmacneill
    Participant

    You will need to be prepared to explain why you left and provide the admissions committee with confidence that you are determined to complete the PhD program this time around. Yes, not finishing the program before will scare away a few programs – but from the sounds of it – you have some evidence and experience that will help start you with a competitive application.

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50738
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. It’s never bad idea to try and better your application through the GRE if you feel you can improve and have the time and resources to dedicate to improving. That said, if you don’t retake the test – I think your GPA reflects that you are likely a good student and your Quant score is quite good. Combine those with strong letters of recommendation and an essay that outlines how your experiences and strengths motivated you towards this degree/field – I think you can be competitive as well.
    Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50683
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. I do think more Chemistry courses will help your application. For PhD programs, it is more about research and your fit with potential faculty and their research work. Your time should also focus on building your research experience and goals – find schools that are a good match with your interests. This combined with more chemistry curriculum will help you become more competitive. Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50630
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. Yes, completing the prerequisites is important for the admissions process – but don’t underestimate the importance of the school and degree. These both play a part in the evaluation process for a graduate program. I would suggest going with a degree that you find interesting and challenging – show the admissions committee your motivation and enthusiasm for the subject and career path. Good luck with your studies.
    Heather

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #50568
    hmacneill
    Participant

    Thanks for your post. Refining your graduate school search based on faculty research is a great way to proceed. I assume you are applying to PhD programs? Reaching out to faculty to inquire about their research and your fit to the program is a good idea. Do, however, make sure that the program is offering the degree that you ultimately want to receive – before applying.
    Regards,
    Heather

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 517 total)