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Viewing 13 posts - 2,221 through 2,233 (of 2,233 total)
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  • in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #26042

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    David,

    Question on application submission. Is there any advantage to submitting early in a round as opposed to sumbitting on the last day of the round?

    Good question. The general answer is no. The particulars to consider are:

    1. Be certain your essays, references, etc. are perfected.
    2. Determine if you are the type of applicant who will incessantly tweak your story and applications, perhaps for the worst by second-guessing yourself.
    3. Project the likelihood you will receive a promotion or have some other accomplishment between the date of application submission and the end of that round.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Admissions #26034

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Although I scored fairly well on my GMAT (710, 96th percentile quant adn 90+ verbal), my overall GPA was weak at a 2.5, despite a 3.2 finance GPA. I’ve been doing I-banking for the past 3 years for a top international firm and have several extracurricular activities. Do I have any shot at top 20 schools?

    Good question. The short answer is yes. An applicant with an area of weakness but other strong areas (it sounds like work experience and extracurriculars are strengths) can gain admission to a top school. It certainly won’t hurt that you have a good GMAT score to mitigate your GPA and demonstrate you can handle the b-school curriculum.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #26030

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    David,

    I took the GMAT in 1997 (the old-fashioned written test) and got a 670. I believe that score is now expired. I took it again in 1999 and got a 640. I feel that the computer format threw me a bit and I think I can get do 50-70 points better if I am more prepared. I am considering taking it again this fall and plan to actually apply to some business schools this time around.

    I have two questions. First, will admissions people think there is something wrong with me because I have taken the test 3 times in 6 years? And second, since one of those past scores is still current, will it be averaged with, or replaced by the new score?

    First of all, ETS (the GMAT test’s administrator) will only send the schools the scores from the past 5 years. As a result, the admissions committees will never see the score from 1997.

    I would strongly encourage you to retake the exam if you are indeed confident you can increase your score by the number of points you suggested above. (Please note I’m assuming your 640 score is well below the mean score of an admitted applicant at the schools you are targeting.)

    If your second score shows a marked improvement, the admissions committees will not think there is anything wrong with you. Furthermore, nearly all schools take your highest score and several will take the highest score from each section of the GMAT. For example, if test A has a higher quantitative score than test B, and test B has a higher verbal score, the school would take the with Q score from test A and the V score from test B. Very few schools will average your 2 GMAT scores.

    Thank you.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #26023

    Hi Jack and thanks for your inquiry.

    Hi. I hope you can find the time to answer my question. Your advice is great BTW.

    Thanks! [:I]

    I have heard you are at a big disadvantage at the top schools if you do not attend an ivy undergrad. I hope this is not true but I do look forward to your honest response, however brutal the truth is.

    Jack

    This is another ‘urban legend’ that, unfortunately, continues to propagate itself. There is an ounce — and only an ounce — of truth which is the admissions officers know grade inflation can be a bit rampant at some schools and therefore a 3.3 from a top-tier undergrad may be viewed similarly to a 3.5 in the same major from a lesser-known school.

    If you are looking at statistics that show a large number of applicants to the top schools come from Ivy League undergrads, bear in mind these two points:

    1. These schools tend to attract a disproportionate amount of talented overachievers.
    2. The ‘feeder companies’ for the top b-schools (think the top consulting firms and investment banks) tend to recruit at these schools.

    If you have the same GMAT, GPA, extracurriculars, and work experience as another applicant and the only difference is that you went to Blank State U and the other applicant attended, say, Princeton, you would both have the same chance of being admitted to a top b-school.

    We have seen this time and time again with our own clients.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25989

    Hi and thanks for your follow-up inquiry.

    Thank you very much for your extremely helpful response.

    No problem! [:)]

    Would it be just as good to take two Economics courses that are more related to my Fulbright Project or would it be better, as far as Admissions is concerned, if I took that dreaded Statistics and one Economics?

    Good question. I don’t have quite enough information to give you a competent answer. Chances are your academic qualifications will not be challenged given your Fulbright scholarship and your math minor. In this scenario, the Stats class would be unnecessary and the most important thing (note: I’m wearing my MBA admissions hat) becomes that you position yourself for those future b-school applications. This includes formulating sound reasons why you want an MBA and putting together an action plan to proactively position you for your post-MBA goals.

    As an example: If you spin a story that you want to market economics research via subscription-based Internet access to small mom and pop businesses, then you probably want to take the two Economics classes so you can learn more about your post-MBA craft. (You would also want to spend some time researching this market as well.)

    Don’t hesitate to contact me directly via email or telephone if you would like to schedule a 1 hour pre admissions consultation with one of our consultants to discuss these matters in more detail.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25985

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    In my undergraduate work at Loyola College in Maryland, I majored in Finance and minored in Math. I only had one Statistics Course, however, and it was an Independent Study. While it was a Calculus-based, upper level stats, will the fact that it was Independent Study discredit it in Admissions’ eyes?

    No. The fact that it was an independent study should not discredit you, particularly if you do well on the GMAT. Additionally, Loyola has a good reputation.

    I have plenty of other quantitative courses (multivariable calculus, you name it) but how important do you think it would be to take A non Independent Study Statistics course for looking more desirable in the eyes of the Admissions Officers? Or is this all very trivial?
    Also, I am looking into doing a Fulbright Scholarship for next year. How much of a boost would taking one or two Grad-Level Business Courses while doing research be for me as far as getting into the MBA Program? Should I try to take the Stats there, or would it be better just to stick with Economics Courses, that are more directly related to my Fulbright Project?

    The admissions committees are not going to be too concerned about your quantitative skills given your minor in math. The Fulbright Scholarship is fine and an additional stats class certainly wouldn’t hurt. However, keep in mind that b-schools only give academic qualifications (GPA and GMAT) about a 35% to 40% weighting in their admission decision process. You will need to spin how your project ties to your post-MBA career goals in your application.

    Do you think it might have given me a slight edge if I do have that strong Statistics background? I know Harvard says, “Due to the academic rigor of the MBA Program, applicants are strongly encouraged to complete introductory quantitative coursework such as accounting, finance, economics, and statistics prior to matriculation. Some candidates may have their admission to the MBA Program contingent on their taking such courses prior to their enrollment.” How would you interpret that? Are they just saying Statistics would help you in your First Year (and is not factored into the Admissions Process) or would having that Strong Statistics Background be a boost in the Admissions Process?

    The truth is if you are a U.S. citizen and GMAT is north of 680, you will easily clear the academic qualifications hurdle at HBS.

    At the Graduate School I am in they grade based upon 80 and above being an A. However, they list your number Grade next to your letter. How would an admissions Officer look at a Graduate Level Grade from a foreign country that says 82 A? Would they look down upon it because of the 82? I had wanted to take two Graduate Level Business Courses for Credit to demonstrate added drive during my Fulbright and to show I can do Graduate LEvel Business Studies but do you think the risks (i.e. they do not really give out grades above a 90) outweigh the benifits?

    No, I’m not worried about this. The admissions committees understand how the grading scales work in different countries. I would advise you to take the stats course and one or two business courses for exactly the reason you gave — to demonstrate an interest in graduate business studies. More importantly though, become an active leader on the campus and start taking proactive steps towards attainment of your post-MBA career goals.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: GMAT Requirement #25980

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    This is a good question that unfortunately does not have an easy answer. The schools look at many factors and the GMAT score is just one of them. Two of the most critical factors the admissions committees examine in conjunction with the GMAT are the applicant’s:

    1. Demographic group and
    2. Academic accomplishments

    The only factor within your control is the academic accomplishments. (You can always build an ‘alternate transcript’.) Clearly if your GMAT math percentile is abysmal but you graduated valedictorian from the nuclear engineering program at MIT, the admissions committees will be far more likely to assume the GMAT score is not an accurate reflection on your ability to handle their school’s curriculum than if you have the same GMAT score but a 2.5 GPA from a not-so-challenging liberal arts program.

    A huge ‘wow’ factor in your application story is also helpful although the admissions committees still want assurances you will be able to handle their curriculum. (In their eyes, there is no point in admitting an applicant who single handedly saved a third-world village from famine if he/she lacks the ability to handle the coursework.)

    As a very general rule, you should not feel discouraged from applying to a b-school if your academic accomplishments are good, you have a decent story to tell, and your GMAT is within 50 or 60 points of the average for your demographic group.

    Finally, of the schools that you listed above, Columbia is the least lenient towards low GMAT score applicants and Wharton is the second least lenient.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25948

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Hi David,

    I have a 760 on GMAT but a low score on AWA. How much of an impact would this low score (3.5) have on my application to tier 1 business schools.

    I wouldn’t worry too much about the AWA score. Fortunately, the AWA does not carry nearly as much weight with the admissions committees as the verbal or quantitative scores. Furthermore, your verbal score has already helped mitigate the 3.5.

    Well-written essays and good admissions interviews will help to further mitigate any concerns about your communication skills.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25942

    quote:


    Originally posted by hbsalltheway

    David,

    I appreciate your keen advice. How important is it to apply in R1, particularly for HBS. I may have to rush to meet that deadline. Should I wait until R2 and hope R2 is less competitive?

    Thanks in advance!


    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    As a general rule, it is always more advantageous to apply in the first round than the second. There are more openings for the incoming class and the admissions committees are trying to fill seats. At the most selective schools, round 2 is when the class becomes ‘rounded out’ and the admissions officers really focus in on getting the right representation from demographic groups such as NY I-bankers and Indian IT applicants.

    There is no truth to the ‘urban legend’ that the second round is less competitive than the first round. The admissions officers know what percent of good applicants apply each round and they adjust their targeted number of admissions offers to reflect this.

    Finally, a good applicant will make a convincing case for why he/she wants to attend XYZ b-school and why he/she has been proactive about wanting an MBA for a long time. Applying in round 1 will certainly help signal this point much more clearly than applying in a later round.

    In conclusion, if you have a good application put together for a top school, it will behoove you to submit it earlier than later.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25930

    quote:


    Originally posted by keenomacdaddy

    David,

    Thanks for taking the time to answer questoins. Is there any way to get into a top 25 MBA program with a 600 GMAT and 2.7 GPA. I kow I can get good references, I interview well and my work exp is good.

    Many thanks!


    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Yes, it is possible to get into a top 25 school with your GPA and GMAT. It is the exception though rather than the rule and you will need to demonstrate great work experience with a rapid career progression. You will also need to mitigate any concerns about your ability to handle the coursework in b-school.

    Letters of reference are helpful if handled properly. Otherwise, they won’t really help you or hurt you since the majority of the other applicants will have similarly favorable references written about them.

    The good news for you is that the b-schools give about a 35% to 40% weighting to your academic qualifications, i.e. your GPA and GMAT.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25917

    Hi Michelle and thanks for your inquiry.

    As I probably know just enough about law school admissions to be dangerous, I’ll let Renee answer the first part of your question. I do know the answer to the second part though. If you want to sign up for the pre admissions consultation, you can just sign up for 1 hour of law school admissions services.

    Best of luck with your future law school applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25910

    quote:


    Originally posted by jwitte

    Thanks David!

    How do you k9ow they kicked out 5 ppl last year? I didnt’ see that on their website.


    Hi and thanks for your follow-up inquiry.

    I’m not sure if it’s also on their website, but I looked at the transcript of an interview one of our consultants conducted with an HBS admissions officer.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    in reply to: Ask AdmissionsConsultants #25907

    quote:


    Originally posted by jwitte

    David,

    Thanks in advance for answering my question. It’s about HBS. Is it tru e all they care about is ledership?


    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Yes, HBS does care **a lot** about leadership and if you don’t demonstrate leadership, you are not getting admitted regardless of GMAT scores, GPA, etc.

    I wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s all they care about even if they give it a heavier weighting than the other top programs. For one thing, they obviously care about integrity. (The fact that 5 people got kicked out this past year due to ‘application discrepancies’ is testament to that.)

    Other important factors are academic qualifications, i.e. you must demonstrate that you can handle their curriculum, so the GMAT and transcripts are also important.

    Finally, having a good ‘story’ that includes airtight reasons for why you want an MBA, why you want to attend Harvard, etc is critical to gaining admission to HBS — or any other selective b-school for that matter.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top b-schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

Viewing 13 posts - 2,221 through 2,233 (of 2,233 total)