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  • #26458
    minglafille
    Participant

    Dear Renee,
    I just have a quick question about recommendations. If I am looking to gain acceptances into the top schools, will a faculty recommendation from an Assistant professor be looked less favorably upon or be given less credibilty than one from a full professor? Are they viewed in a different light by admissions officers?

    #26461
    rpost
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Letters of recommendation should provide detailed information about you as an applicant. A substantive letter from an assistant professor will have a greater impact than a general letter from a full professor.

    Good luck-
    Renee

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26611
    avaraka
    Participant

    Hi i just got my LSAT scores back and got a 161. I’m a junior and I took them early so that I would be able to take them over if needed. I’m not sure if I should take them over or if 161 is a strong enough score to get into a top 25 law school. My GPA is a 3.47 right now and i think I coudl get it up to a 3.5 before I apply. Also, if a school’s range is 163-168, should I bother appyling with a 161 or no? please reply when you get a chance, thanks.

    #26612
    avaraka
    Participant

    Hi i just got my LSAT scores back and got a 161. I’m a junior and I took them early so that I would be able to take them over if needed. I’m not sure if I should take them over or if 161 is a strong enough score to get into a top 25 law school. My GPA is a 3.47 right now and i think I coudl get it up to a 3.5 before I apply. Also, if a school’s range is 163-168, should I bother appyling with a 161 or no? please reply when you get a chance, thanks.

    #26625
    rpost
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry. Whether or not you should retake the LSAT depends on how well you prepared for the exam. If you feel as though you did everything you could to study for the test and nothing out of the ordinary occurred during the administration of the test – I recommend not retaking the exam.

    In terms of the competitiveness of your score, you do not want to take yourself out of the running for a particular law school simply because your LSAT falls within the 25% for that school. Instead look at the entire application package you will submit to the admissions committees. Do you have a compelling story to tell that will set you apart from the other applicants? In addition, think about your letters of recommendation, your undergraduate performance and significant activities (community service, extra curricular activities and professional experiences) you have in your profile.

    If you would like to schedule a pre admission consultation to discuss your applications further please feel free to contact AdmissionsConsultants at the number below.

    Best wishes,
    Renee

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26673
    Monkey555
    Participant

    I am planning on applying to Yale, Harvard, and Stanford. I know that every little bit counts so I have a couple questions:

    1. Do school-specific letters of Recommendation carry more weight than using the LSAC forms? I am wondering if I should have my Recommender tweek their letters for each school.

    2. Do different schools have different characteristics they particularly value? Is Yale looking for the intellectual-type activist and Harvard looking for a corporate-type?

    3. How many letters is too many?

    Thank you very much.

    #26678
    rpost
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    You pose an interesting question concerning letters of recommendation. I suggest researching each school you plan to apply to and tailor your application to their specific criteria. Some schools require applicants to use the LSDAS letter of recommendation service while others will accept letters submitted directly to the admissions office, via your undergraduate career services office, or with your application.

    To your specific question, school specific letters can be helpful (and are required by some schools). What is of the utmost importance is that you use sound judgment when selecting your recommenders and offer your recommenders information about your past accomplishments and future goals.

    In terms of how many letters to submit, again do your research as this varies from one school to the next. If you choose to submit more than the required number of letters be sure the additional letters offer new information into your abilities.

    One of our consultants would be happy to discuss with you school selection and how to market yourself in your application(s). Please feel free to schedule a consultation by calling the number below.

    Best wishes,
    Renee

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26680

    Renee Post is very close to her full capacity right now. While she will continue to work with her current applicants and new clients this fall, she will not be accepting new clients for approximately one month.

    To help provide her with more time to meet her current clients’ needs, Mark Meyerrose will be moderating this thread in her absence. Mark holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from Harvard. He also spent 4 years at Harvard Law School. He was a financial aid officer his first year and an admission officer for the remaining three years.

    Mark is still accepting new law school clients and he will be glad to assist you with ding analyses and pre admissions consultations to ensure you are optimally positioned for your future applications.

    Best of luck with your applications!

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    @admissionsconsultants.com">DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    Admissions committee experience from the top law schools

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26707
    minglafille
    Participant

    Hi Mark,
    I have a rather specific question regarding an internship that I am currently working for. It is at a NGO and I am receiving 8 credits from it that will show up on my transcript. However, I am not graded based on my performance at the internship, but on a thesis paper that I will be writing during the internship. My question is, how would I show this on my application, the fact that I had to write a fairly extensive thesis and has a set criteria for the grading of the internship?

    Thank you for your time.

    #26708
    mmeyerrose
    Participant

    Hi Ming and thanks for your question.

    Some schools will be more flexible than others in accepting addendums and additional applications materials. With that being said, the most effective way of discussing this peculiar grading system your school has would be to have your thesis advisor write one of your letters of reference. Having him/her write on your behalf would be effective for two main reasons: a) s/he will probably know you the best among all your professors; and b) s/he can convincingly comment upon the great work you did in this internship and the quality (and content) of your academic work (i.e. the thesis).

    This internship will provide you with a lot of excellent material to discuss in your applications; there is a lot of good material which could be leveraged in marketing yourself to the schools of your choice.

    Mark JF Meyerrose

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26781
    femmefriday
    Participant

    This question is for anyone who knows about the admissions process, especially at Harvard (HLS).

    About one week or so after I had turned in my application materials to Harvard, I received a rather large packet from them. Included was a really nice, long letter expressing their delight in my interest in HLS, and a view-book dicussing all aspects of Harvard Law. I know that this is clearly a good sign, and that most people don’t get this material. My question is this: How does the number of view-books sent out to candidates relate to the number of acceptance offers? There are 800-900 acceptances offered by Harvard. Would the number of view-books sent out to candidates be far fewer than that number (possibly a few hundred or so)? Or rather do they send out more view-books than they have open spots for admission? I could see the former suggesting that I am almost surely in, granted no red flags pop up during the committee reviews. The latter suggests something quite different though. It would suggest that I was only a qualified candidate, and while I had made first cuts, I was still a part of a larger group that needed to be whittled down. But this would also suggest that those who did not receive the view-book would almost definitely be denied. I don’t really know enough people who have applied to harvard to figure this one out. So I guess I am sort of curious if anyone knows the view-book stats in general, or better yet Harvard esp.

    Secondly, I am also curious to know if the top schools (Yale, Stanford, Harvard, Columbia..) discuss btwn each other the applicants they all receive, in order to figure out where some are better fit and more likely to go, so that overlapping acceptances are controlled and acceptances of offers can better be determined.

    Thanks for any info. you can provide me.
    -femmefriday

    #26785
    mmeyerrose
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    Having worked in the Admissions Office at HLS, I would caution against reading too much into a “marketing effort” such as this. A week is far too short of a time for them to have given your application any sort of substantive review. That being said, I am certain you are hitting a demographic which they are targeting in their recruiting and admissions efforts. In a week’s time they will have requested and received your LSDAS report which contains, not only, your LSAT score (of course:-) and transcript analysis but also some basic personal information: gender, age, ethnicity, citizenship, etc. With these 5 or 6 data points they will know whether you are a strong candidate and whether you are from a group whose presence they are trying to increase in their student body.

    So, my ‘read’ on your receipt of the view book is this: you should feel encouraged that you are part of a population they are targeting; however, they will be targeting a fairly large number of people with the hope that a) these individuals will indeed be top-tier candidates “worthy” of admissions and b) once admitted they will in fact choose to attend HLS. In short, you are part of a large group from which you will still need to distinguish yourself.

    As for your second question: schools cannot share this sort of information. It is collusion and in strict violation of antitrust laws. In fact, in the early ‘90s the Ivy League colleges were sued over the practice of sharing information pertaining to financial aid; they were issued a very clear and stern slap on the wrist for this practice. This same ruling applies to the sharing of admissions information at the law school level. What you are suggesting is a definite ‘no-no’!

    Best wishes,

    Mark

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26805
    bk123
    Participant

    If sending a letter to confirm interest in a school that has waitlisted me, should the letter be directed to the same entity as the original application, e.g., admissions coordinator, or to the individual (by name) from whom I received the waitlist letter, e.g., assistant dean of admissions?

    Thanks.

    #26825
    mmeyerrose
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for your question.

    You should address your letter to the person who signed the waitlist letter—in all likelihood the director or dean of admissions. If there is another admissions officer in the admissions office (other than the director/dean of admissions) with whom you have had contact, you should consider CC’ing that person on your letter. By doing so, you will keep all your contacts “in the loop” as far as your candidacy and interest are concerned.

    Good luck!

    Mark JF Meyerrose

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #26911
    adross25
    Participant

    I applied to New York Law School and my LSAT/GPA credentials net me a 50/50 shot of getting in. My work expereince in professional sports business & volunteer work in youth sports is extensive for a 25 year old so I am hoping that helps me get in.

    Here’s the problem: On my application that I submitted electronically I noticed today that I failed to include my major (Marketing). Your major however is automatically included on your LSDAS report.

    I submitted the application on 3/7. On 4/6 I got a letter from the admissions office saying my application is complete and is ready to be reviewed. As of today, I have not yet heard from them. Their application deadline was 4/15.

    Do you think I should submit a letter stating my major and how I failed to include it, or should I do nothing at this point and hope it goes unnoticed?

    Feeling stupid,

    Adam

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 602 total)
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