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  • #28183

    mdtizzle
    Participant

    Hello,

    I graduated from college in may 2003 with a 3.81 GPA, biology major. At the time i had planned on attending dental school. Since, I have changed my mind and have decided to pursue osteopathic medicine. I’m taking the MCAT in april, and will be applying for admission next summer (for the 2006 year). My father was a D.O. and I know a few other D.O.s quite well. My recommedations from faculty are somewhat lacking and I dont have too much community service / volunteer work under my belt. The plan for the next while is to work with/observe an osteopathic cardiologist, do volunteer work at the local hospital, and then tatk a couple of courses to get more faculty recommendations. Assuming I do well on the MCAT, can you think of anything more I should add to the next 9 months in order to have a good shot at getting in. I have not shadowed or worked with any osteopathic physicians for an extended amount of time (more than a couple months), other than my father, is this going to be much of a factor, especially if I spend the next 9 or so months working with this cardiologist? furthermore, how much observation / office time is recommended with a physician to get in?

    Thanks
    Matt

    #28239

    abram
    Participant

    I’m a second semester junior looking at finishing college in a total of five years, maybe five and a half. I’ve got a 3.64 gpa towards a ba in biology. I have no desire for med school or an MBA or anything, I’m thinking about forestry, environmental studies or some thing completely unrelated. How much does the amount of W’s on your record and time spent to finish matter? I do well on tests and am hoping to nail the GRE’s.

    #28242

    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hello and thank you for your question. The Ws on your transcripts will certainly be a factor in the review of your application. However, if you can show the admissions committee through your GPA, test scores and application content that you are a competitive applicant, it will make them less of a factor. You will need to pay extra attention to your personal statement and letters of reference to make sure they communicate that you are a dedicated and motivated student/applicant. You may have the opportunity to address your transcripts in the application through a direct question or essay. My only caution is that you try to avoid making excuses for the Ws and explain the circumstances while taking responsibility for them. Best of luck to you.

    Heather MacNeill

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    quote:


    Originally posted by abram

    I’m a second semester junior looking at finishing college in a total of five years, maybe five and a half. I’ve got a 3.64 gpa towards a ba in biology. I have no desire for med school or an MBA or anything, I’m thinking about forestry, environmental studies or some thing completely unrelated. How much does the amount of W’s on your record and time spent to finish matter? I do well on tests and am hoping to nail the GRE’s.


    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #28310

    yehrf
    Participant

    Dear AdmissionsConsultant[:)],

    I have serious questions about getting a degree of Master in Finance
    from Princeton U. The reason is because I really liked risk management work and analyzing stock pricing.

    I graduated from a good 1st Tier undergraduate university (US News low end of top 25) with a degree in History and am pursuing my law degree at a little-known 4th tier law school. My undergraduate gpa was about 2.9, and my gpa at the law school is about 2.5.

    My questions are these:

    1) When I say that my undergrad gpa is 2.9, I did not include about
    60 credit hours of work of average gpa 3.45 at another college before transfer to the university that I got my diploma.

    When the graduate school admissions committee look at this, how will
    they consider my undergraduate gpa? Will they a. mix both gpa and get
    a overall gpa evaluation? b. consider gpa at both universities
    separately?

    What then should “overall gpa” be in their consideration for the purpose of my graduate school application

    2) How will the admissions committee evaluate my undergraduate gpa and graduate gpa?

    3) The reason my graduate gpa is only 2.5-2.6 is because my 4th tier
    law school keeps a very low medium and mean for student’s gpa.
    They try to keep everybody around 2.75 (most popular gpa figure in my law school), which is very low compared with most other law schools’ grading scales. Not to mention that many law schools’ gpa are on 0-4.3 scale. My law school’s gpa standard is on a 4.0 scale.

    How Will the graduate school admissions committee recognize this factor, that some schools’ gpa systems do not inflate like others?

    If not, how will I explain this matter to them?
    Is this a very disadvantage factor for me?

    4) The degree of Master in Finance has a lot to do with background Math courses in undergrad.

    Princeton’s website states that, “You can submit your GMAT scores instead of GRE’s….Our entering classes have had a median GRE score of 790 on the quantitative part (you may take the exam more than once, in which case we consider your highest score). We pay particular attention to your mathematics background (courses taken in college, scores on the quantitative parts of the tests, etc.).
    The single most common reason applicants are not admitted is that their math background is not strong enough to allow them to benefit from the program.”

    I have taken some mathmatics courses during my undergrad, but I don’t think my math ground is strong enough to meet their reqirements. My undergraduate university offers undergraduate students who have graduated to finish “another major” as guest students.

    Should I take the chance to finish a undergrduate major in finance mathmatics in order to make me competitive enough to get into this program? I figured that there are about 9 courses I have to take to get a undergrad major in finance mathmatics.

    Would it be worth while to spend the money to take these 9 courses? When I say “Worth while”, I mean would it greatly assist me, as a necessary factor, in getting admitted into the Master of Finance Program at Princeton?

    As I mentioned before that my undergrad GPA and my law gpa is no where near the level of competitiveness. Will the graduate school committee look at the “major gpa” more important than the “overall gpa”? If I have an above average “major gpa” by getting the undergraduate major in finance math, will they pay close
    attention to that more than the overall gpa?

    5) Most, if not all, of the Master in Finance Programs in the country, have specified some sort of gpa figure
    for their entering class. On Princeton’s FAQ site, they don’t mention it.

    Does this mean that the admissions there will place less weight on GPA than standardized test of GMAT/GRE?

    6) Lastly, I have not yet taken GMAT, but am in preparation of it.
    On working experience. Princeton website states, “While the program does not require formal work experience as a requirement for admission, prior work experience can be a definite plus.
    At a minimum, we expect applicants to have completed one or more internships (for instance over the summer while in college).” Since I am an international student in US, working experience is definitely difficult for me to come by especially in the finance section becuase of legal restriction for non-citizen workers.

    What best advice can you offer me or recommend me now if I want to achieve my goal in getting a Master of Finance degree from Princeton? or Is this even possible for me to pursue the graduate admissions at Princeton[?]

    Thank you so much for your time[8D]

    #28311

    quote:


    Originally posted by yehrf

    Dear AdmissionsConsultant[:)],

    I have serious questions about getting a degree of Master in Finance
    from Princeton U. The reason is because I really liked risk management work and analyzing stock pricing.

    I graduated from a good 1st Tier undergraduate university (US News low end of top 25) with a degree in History and am pursuing my law degree at a little-known 4th tier law school. My undergraduate gpa was about 2.9, and my gpa at the law school is about 2.5.

    My questions are these:

    1) When I say that my undergrad gpa is 2.9, I did not include about
    60 credit hours of work of average gpa 3.45 at another college before transfer to the university that I got my diploma.

    When the graduate school admissions committee look at this, how will
    they consider my undergraduate gpa? Will they a. mix both gpa and get
    a overall gpa evaluation? b. consider gpa at both universities
    separately?

    What then should “overall gpa” be in their consideration for the purpose of my graduate school application

    2) How will the admissions committee evaluate my undergraduate gpa and graduate gpa?

    3) The reason my graduate gpa is only 2.5-2.6 is because my 4th tier
    law school keeps a very low medium and mean for student’s gpa.
    They try to keep everybody around 2.75 (most popular gpa figure in my law school), which is very low compared with most other law schools’ grading scales. Not to mention that many law schools’ gpa are on 0-4.3 scale. My law school’s gpa standard is on a 4.0 scale.

    How Will the graduate school admissions committee recognize this factor, that some schools’ gpa systems do not inflate like others?

    If not, how will I explain this matter to them?
    Is this a very disadvantage factor for me?

    4) The degree of Master in Finance has a lot to do with background Math courses in undergrad.

    Princeton’s website states that, “You can submit your GMAT scores instead of GRE’s….Our entering classes have had a median GRE score of 790 on the quantitative part (you may take the exam more than once, in which case we consider your highest score). We pay particular attention to your mathematics background (courses taken in college, scores on the quantitative parts of the tests, etc.).
    The single most common reason applicants are not admitted is that their math background is not strong enough to allow them to benefit from the program.”

    I have taken some mathmatics courses during my undergrad, but I don’t think my math ground is strong enough to meet their reqirements. My undergraduate university offers undergraduate students who have graduated to finish “another major” as guest students.

    Should I take the chance to finish a undergrduate major in finance mathmatics in order to make me competitive enough to get into this program? I figured that there are about 9 courses I have to take to get a undergrad major in finance mathmatics.

    Would it be worth while to spend the money to take these 9 courses? When I say “Worth while”, I mean would it greatly assist me, as a necessary factor, in getting admitted into the Master of Finance Program at Princeton?

    As I mentioned before that my undergrad GPA and my law gpa is no where near the level of competitiveness. Will the graduate school committee look at the “major gpa” more important than the “overall gpa”? If I have an above average “major gpa” by getting the undergraduate major in finance math, will they pay close
    attention to that more than the overall gpa?

    5) Most, if not all, of the Master in Finance Programs in the country, have specified some sort of gpa figure
    for their entering class. On Princeton’s FAQ site, they don’t mention it.

    Does this mean that the admissions there will place less weight on GPA than standardized test of GMAT/GRE?

    6) Lastly, I have not yet taken GMAT, but am in preparation of it.
    On working experience. Princeton website states, “While the program does not require formal work experience as a requirement for admission, prior work experience can be a definite plus.
    At a minimum, we expect applicants to have completed one or more internships (for instance over the summer while in college).” Since I am an international student in US, working experience is definitely difficult for me to come by especially in the finance section becuase of legal restriction for non-citizen workers.

    What best advice can you offer me or recommend me now if I want to achieve my goal in getting a Master of Finance degree from Princeton? or Is this even possible for me to pursue the graduate admissions at Princeton[?]

    Thank you so much for your time[8D]


    Hi and thanks for your inquiry.

    While we do not mind demonstrating our expertise and assisting this board’s members, this post is far too long to be addressed in proper depth in this medium and Heather can much more effectively and efficiently answer all of these questions within an initial one-hour consultation.

    Sincerely,

    David Petersam
    President
    AdmissionsConsultants, Inc.
    DPetersam@admissionsconsultants.com

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #28443

    bubabuggy
    Participant

    I will be applying to medical school in June 2005. However, is it also possible for me to apply to a biology graduate school with the MCAT or would I have to take the GRE? Or– would having the MCAT instead of the GRE raise red flags and they will wonder why I’m applying to grad school in the first place? Getting into med school is hard so I want to start looking at my career alternatives instead of potentially wasting a year to see if I get accepted into med school.

    #28448

    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hello and thank you for your questions. Most (but not all) graduate programs do require the GRE and will also require the specific subject test for their area of focus. Most programs will also try to assess, through the admissions process, the applicants’ passion for their chosen area of study. So, your concern about the MCAT being a red flag for a biology program may be accurate. However, some graduate biology programs will accept the MCAT as an alternative for the GRE and for those you would probably be ok with just the MCAT. Best of luck to you.

    Heather MacNeill

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    quote:


    Originally posted by bubabuggy

    I will be applying to medical school in June 2005. However, is it also possible for me to apply to a biology graduate school with the MCAT or would I have to take the GRE? Or– would having the MCAT instead of the GRE raise red flags and they will wonder why I’m applying to grad school in the first place? Getting into med school is hard so I want to start looking at my career alternatives instead of potentially wasting a year to see if I get accepted into med school.


    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #28561

    DoeDakota
    Participant

    Hello AdmissionsConsultants,

    I am applying to Fordham University’s IPED program and am concerned that I will not be accepted. I have decided to specialize in International and Development Economics. My Michigan State U. GPA was 3.8 with a major in Economics, Honors College membership, and Phi Beta Kappa membership. I have two years working experience at medium-sized bank as a credit analyst. I have recently been promoted to a senior analyst. I took the GRE and received a V560 (75%), M680 (64%) and W 3.5 (17%). I have secured recommendations from a economics professor (4.0 2x), philosophy professor (4.0 2x) and language professor (4.0 2x). I have yet to finish my personal statement. I should be in contact with the director/IPED office this week to discuss a potential visit, research opportunities and application/GRE worthiness. What do you think? Thank you.

    #28643

    nh116
    Participant

    Hello,
    I’m trying to assess my chances for admission to Columbia’s English masters program. I graduated two years ago from Barnard with a 3.39 GPA (3.33 major GPA), was a double major with a 3.53 in my history major, and also held several prestigious magazine internships. I took the GREs without studying for them in late October and received a 660 Verbal (91%), 500 Math (26%) and 5.5 writing (86%).

    The application is not due until April, although I believe it is rolling (and, of course, would rather get it in sooner than later). Should I retake the GREs? My math score will definitely not increase (I am a mathmatical dunce), though I do believe I could probably up my verbal, were I to study some more. Do I even have a chance with my GPA? Can a higher GRE score increase it, or is my score sufficient?

    Any help would be appreciated!

    #28644

    oldy31
    Participant

    Hi,
    I want to pursue a one-year MBA programme in a good business school. Could you pls suggest which schools I should apply? I was planning to apply to:
    Schulich – York
    Rotman – Toronto
    SBS – Oxford
    JIMS – Cambridge
    RSM – Rotterdam

    How are my chances in these schools?

    Here is my profile:
    Age: 31
    Work Ex (Software Development + Consultancy) : 9 years
    Nationality: Indian
    GPA: 3.7
    GMAT: 650 (Miserable!)

    #28675

    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hello and thank you for your questions. Certainly, if you feel you could improve your GRE verbal scores by studying, then any improvement would be great. The math scores will not be as big of a concern for them in this program. In addition to the GRE and your GPA, the admissions committee will look at many other aspects of your application. Your letters of recommendation and a strong personal essay can make a distinct impression on the admissions committee. If these documents show that you are a unique and well qualified applicant they can make up a lot of ground where the GPA and test scores did not. The personal statement is your best way of making yourself standout and make your case. So, while the GRE is worth focusing on, don’t forget about the other aspects of the application. Best of luck to you.

    Heather MacNeill

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885
    [

    quote]Originally posted by nh116

    Hello,
    I’m trying to assess my chances for admission to Columbia’s English masters program. I graduated two years ago from Barnard with a 3.39 GPA (3.33 major GPA), was a double major with a 3.53 in my history major, and also held several prestigious magazine internships. I took the GREs without studying for them in late October and received a 660 Verbal (91%), 500 Math (26%) and 5.5 writing (86%).

    The application is not due until April, although I believe it is rolling (and, of course, would rather get it in sooner than later). Should I retake the GREs? My math score will definitely not increase (I am a mathmatical dunce), though I do believe I could probably up my verbal, were I to study some more. Do I even have a chance with my GPA? Can a higher GRE score increase it, or is my score sufficient?

    Any help would be appreciated!
    [/quote]

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #28676

    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for posting. This question should be posted on the MBA/ask Admissions Consultants thread. Please repost there and an MBA consultant will help you.

    quote:


    Originally posted by oldy31

    Hi,
    I want to pursue a one-year MBA programme in a good business school. Could you pls suggest which schools I should apply? I was planning to apply to:
    Schulich – York
    Rotman – Toronto
    SBS – Oxford
    JIMS – Cambridge
    RSM – Rotterdam

    How are my chances in these schools?

    Here is my profile:
    Age: 31
    Work Ex (Software Development + Consultancy) : 9 years
    Nationality: Indian
    GPA: 3.7
    GMAT: 650 (Miserable!)


    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    #28728

    AdmissionsBoards
    Keymaster

    Hello,

    I’m only a sophmore in undergrad right now, but I’m considering going to grad school when I graduate to get an MBA. I was wondering, are there any good MBA programs that accept kids right out of undergrad?

    #28733

    aspen17
    Participant

    Hi,

    I am a “first-timer”-hope I am posting this correctly…

    I am trying to get into grad school to study international affairs. My undergrad degree is in Political Science from the Univ of Colorado. Although my performance in high school was stellar, I graduated from college with a GPA of 2.3 due mostly to maturity and socialization issues.

    I applied to grad school recently complete with an essay regarding my academic problems as an undergrad and my passion for furthering my education and “doing it right” this time. My GRE scores were 610 quantitative, 640 verbal, and I received a score of 5 (out of 6) on the writing assessment. I have no doubts about my abilities, but apparently was not able to convince admissions of the same. I was denied admission, and am not sure how to proceed from here.

    I have also taken 2 quarters of Arabic at the local college, and am continuing those studies. The most recent quarter I chose to take “for credit”, and earned an A (undergrad level class). I will continue probably at least 2-3 more quarters of study in this field (for credit).

    I know the more credits I can earn help my chances of getting into grad school, but what can I do beyond this to enhance my admissions packet?

    I should add that I had excellent recommendations, but none were from professors or people in this field, as I have been out of school about 5 years and do not work in the field I am attempting to study. (In fact, I am seeking this degree, in part, to help gain employment in the field.)

    I do not want to give up, and am willing to do any extra leg-work to get in, but am unsure which activities would most benefit my application packet.

    Any advice is welcome! Thanks in advance.

    #28736

    hmacneill
    Participant

    Hello and thank you for your questions. You are certainly in a tough spot, trying to convince an admissions committee to look past your GPA. There are several things you can do to help persuade a committee to choose you for their program. I think taking courses is a good way to show some current grades and course work and as long as you do well and take the right kinds of classes. It won’t, of course, change your GPA but could show recent academic success. Taking courses in economics and other international studies related courses will help show your continued commitment and motivation. I agree with your continued language courses, a 2nd language is highly valued. Since you do not currently work in a related field, it might be worth while to pursue some volunteer opportunities to help you build your resume. This will also show your motivation. Finally, the best way get past a low GPA in your application is to be able to communicate to the admissions committee your understanding of the field and prove to them that you are a qualified and unique applicant for their program. This is best done through your personal statement, and can be a very powerful component to your application. Best of luck to you.

    Heather MacNeill

    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

    quote:


    Originally posted by aspen17

    Hi,

    I am a “first-timer”-hope I am posting this correctly…

    I am trying to get into grad school to study international affairs. My undergrad degree is in Political Science from the Univ of Colorado. Although my performance in high school was stellar, I graduated from college with a GPA of 2.3 due mostly to maturity and socialization issues.

    I applied to grad school recently complete with an essay regarding my academic problems as an undergrad and my passion for furthering my education and “doing it right” this time. My GRE scores were 610 quantitative, 640 verbal, and I received a score of 5 (out of 6) on the writing assessment. I have no doubts about my abilities, but apparently was not able to convince admissions of the same. I was denied admission, and am not sure how to proceed from here.

    I have also taken 2 quarters of Arabic at the local college, and am continuing those studies. The most recent quarter I chose to take “for credit”, and earned an A (undergrad level class). I will continue probably at least 2-3 more quarters of study in this field (for credit).

    I know the more credits I can earn help my chances of getting into grad school, but what can I do beyond this to enhance my admissions packet?

    I should add that I had excellent recommendations, but none were from professors or people in this field, as I have been out of school about 5 years and do not work in the field I am attempting to study. (In fact, I am seeking this degree, in part, to help gain employment in the field.)

    I do not want to give up, and am willing to do any extra leg-work to get in, but am unsure which activities would most benefit my application packet.

    Any advice is welcome! Thanks in advance.


    AdmissionsConsultants
    703.242.5885

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